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The Psychology
of Everything
Know the psychology.
Understand your world.
See life in a new way.
Series from Routledge

Welcome!

People are fascinated by psychology, and what makes humans tick. Why do we think and behave the way we do? We’ve all met armchair psychologists claiming to have the answers, and people that ask if psychologists can tell what they’re thinking. The Psychology of Everything is a series of books which debunk the popular myths and pseudo-science surrounding some of life’s biggest questions.

Throughout this website you will find specially written content pieces, where the authors expand upon some of the key themes from their books, considering contemporary issues such as the #MeToo movement and how we label our snack food.

You can also find additional information on the people behind the books, with extended author biographies, and links to their social media accounts.

Books

The Psychology of Addiction

The Psychology of Addiction

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The Psychology of Celebrity

The Psychology of Celebrity

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The Psychology of Chess

The Psychology of Chess

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The Psychology of Climate Change

The Psychology of Climate Change

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The Psychology of Conspiracy Theories

The Psychology of Conspiracy Theories

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The Psychology of Dieting

The Psychology of Dieting

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The Psychology of Dog Ownership

The Psychology of Dog Ownership

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The Psychology of Driving

The Psychology of Driving

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The Psychology of Fashion

The Psychology of Fashion

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The Psychology of Gardening

The Psychology of Gardening

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The Psychology of Gender

The Psychology of Gender

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The Psychology of Grief

The Psychology of Grief

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The Psychology of Happiness

The Psychology of Happiness

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The Psychology of Music

The Psychology of Music

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The Psychology of Performance

The Psychology of Performance

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The Psychology of Politics

The Psychology of Politics

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The Psychology of Retirement

The Psychology of Retirement

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The Psychology of School Bullying

The Psychology of School Bullying

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The Psychology of Sex

The Psychology of Sex

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The Psychology of Social Media

The Psychology of Social Media

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The Psychology of the Paranormal

The Psychology of the Paranormal

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The Psychology of Trust

The Psychology of Trust

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The Psychology of Vampires

The Psychology of Vampires

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The Psychology of Weather

The Psychology of Weather

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The Psychology of Working Life

The Psychology of Working Life

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Content Pieces

Carolyn Mair

Carolyn Mair, author of ‘The Psychology of Fashion’ talks about why we need to start applying a psychological lens to our thoughts about fashion.

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Jane Ogden

Jane Ogden, author of ‘The Psychology of Dieting’, talks about how food labelled as ‘snack food’ can actually leave you hungrier than food labelled ‘meal’.

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Gary Wood

Gary Wood, author of ’The Psychology of Gender’ tackles prejudice, homophobia, and why we shouldn’t give a f**k.

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Ken Rotenberg

Ken Rotenberg, author of ‘The Psychology of Trust’ provides insight into people’s personal struggles with trust, with accompanying audio files.

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Meg-John Barker

Meg-John Barker, author of ‘The Psychology of Sex’ discusses the #MeToo movement and the importance of consent.

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Richard Gross

Richard Gross, author of ‘The Psychology of Grief’, provides his guiding principles for working with the bereaved.

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Theresa Barlow and Craig Roberts, authors of ‘The Psychology of Dogs’, talk about the joy of understanding dog behaviour.

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Barry Richards

Barry Richards, author of ‘The Psychology of Politics’, talks about what psychology can tell us about populism and the changing nature of democracy.

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Gayle Stever

Gayle Stever, author of ‘The Psychology of Celebrity’, talks about colleagues and writers who inspired her interest in celebrity research.

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Geoff Beattie and Laura McGuire

Geoffrey Beattie and Laura McGuire, authors of ‘The Psychology of Climate Change’, talk about psychology shapes our views on climate and change and how we can use it to promote action.

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Dr Ciaran Mc Mahon

Ciarán Mc Mahon, author of ‘The Psychology of Social Media’, talks about his experience creating the book.

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Jane Ogden

Jane Ogden

Jane Ogden is a Professor in Health Psychology at the University of Surrey.  She completed her PhD on eating behaviour about 30 years ago and has been involved in research and writing about eating behaviour and weight management since this time.  She has published 8 books and over 180 research papers most relating to aspects of diet.

Her books include: Fat Chance: the Myth of Dieting Explained; The psychology of eating; and The Good Parenting Food Guide which have been aimed at both academic readers and the general public.  She is also is a frequent contributor to the media for newspapers, magazines, radio and TV shows.  For example, she has written features for The Conversation, the Independent, The Huffington Post, the Daily Mail and Sky News online, been a guest on Women’s hour, All in the Mind as well as numerous radio shows and has appeared in TV programmes including Channel 4s Secret Eaters, The Truth about Fat and The secret of staying slim.   She has also been involved in numerous consultancy projects for companies involved in food such as Jamie Oliver’s Kitchen Garden Project and his Ministry of Food Foundation, hello fresh and Premier Foods and has produced an online module on eating behaviour and weight loss for Advanced Coaching Academy for personal trainers and coaches to use with their clients. 

Harriet Gross

Harriet Gross

Before I did my psychology degree at Reading University, I worked in publishing, ran a small bookshop in South London, and spent a year at Reuters. After my degree, I went to do a PhD at Nottingham University. My first research job was at the Institute of Education in London on a project about education for children with special needs. Then I worked with employers and training providers looking at how to assess vocational training. In 1989 I moved to Loughborough University as a Lecturer in Psychology, where I spent many happy years teaching developmental psychology. In 2007 I moved to Lincoln University to be Professor and Head of Psychology, and where I am now part of the University’s senior leadership team.

My research is often prompted by what people find personally meaningful, sometimes around times of transition, and has expanded from children to the whole lifespan. Working with colleagues and students, I have researched aspects of memory, work and physical activity in pregnancy, ageing, and gardening. One project explored gardening in sheltered housing. Sparked by an email conversation, a team of us at Lincoln developed the ‘Digital Capabilities’ garden, that responded to Twitter messages and won a gold medal at the 2013 Chelsea Flower Show.

I am on the boards of Green Synergy, a local Lincoln community gardening charity, and of a dementia charity, Hope for Home.  I am also committed to the dissemination of psychology to a wider audience and I am a member of the British Psychological Society editorial committee for The Psychologist magazine and Research Digest.

Aside from work, I garden, I spend my time enjoying films, books and walking, and the company of friends and family.

Meg-John Barker

Meg-John Barker

Meg-John Barker is the author of a number of popular books on sex, gender, and relationships, including Queer: A Graphic History (with Julia Scheele), How To Understand Your Gender (with Alex Iantaffi), Enjoy Sex (How, When, and IF You Want To) (with Justin Hancock), Rewriting the Rules, The Psychology of Sex, and The Secrets of Enduring Love (with Jacqui Gabb). They have also written numerous books, articles, chapters, and reports for scholars and counsellors, drawing on their own research and therapeutic practice.

In particular they have focused their academic-activist work on the topics of bisexuality, open non-monogamy, sadomasochism, non-binary gender, and Buddhist mindfulness. Barker is currently a senior lecturer in psychology at the Open University. They co-founded the journal Psychology & Sexuality and the activist-research organisation BiUK, through which they published The Bisexuality Report. They have advised many organisations, therapeutic bodies, and governmental departments on matters relating to gender, sexual, and relationship diversity (GSRD). They are also involved in facilitating many public events on sexuality and relationships, including Sense about Sex and Critical Sexology.

Stewart Cotterill

Stewart Cotterill

Stewart Cotterill, PhD, is Head of School for Health, Wellbeing and Performance; a consultant sport and performance psychologist, and a leadership and performance researcher at AECC University College, Bournemouth, UK. He is a British Psychological Society (BPS) Chartered Psychologist; and is a Registered Practitioner Psychologist with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).

Stewart has been working as a psychology consultant for over 15 years and has extensive applied practice experience across multiple performance domains including: sport, business, the performing arts and medicine. His current research interests include the psychology of performance, decision-making under pressure, leadership in sport, and factors determining team performance under pressure. He is also author of a number of other books including: Performance Psychology; Team Psychology in Sports; Psychology of Cricket; and Sport and Exercise Psychology: Practitioner Case Studies. He is also the coordinator of the sport and performance psychology clinic based at the AECC University College Parkwood campus in Bournemouth. Providing psychology support services from performing at the elite level down to aspiring and local level performers from across a broad range of performance domains.

Toon Taris

Toon Taris

Toon Taris (1962) received a BSc and MSc in Administrative Science/Research Methods (Free University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands), and received a PhD in Psychology from that university in 1994 on a thesis that focused on the analysis of the work career trajectories of young adults. Subsequently he held several positions as a post-doctoral researcher. In 2000 he was appointed Assistant professor at the Department of Work and Organizational Psychology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen, followed by appointments of Associate and Full Professor (2006). In 2009 he was appointed Full Professor at the department of Social and Organizational Psychology of Utrecht University.

He has published several hundreds of papers, chapters and books in the area of work and organizational psychology on topics such as stress, workaholism, work motivation, burnout and work engagement. He is member of the boards of several Dutch and international scientific journals, and Editor-in-Chief of Work & Stress, one of the leading journals in occupational health psychology.

Toon Taris is married (three children), lives in the heart of the Netherlands, and spends his leisure time (if any) on gardening, reading books, playing guitar, or on what he likes to think of as "home improvement" activities.

Jan-Willem van Prooijen

Jan-Willem van Prooijen

Jan-Willem van Prooijen received his PhD in 2002 from the Department of Social and Organizational Psychology at Leiden University. Currently he works as Associate Professor at the department of Experimental and Applied Psychology of VU Amsterdam, and as Senior Researcher at the Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement. He has been fascinated by the psychology of conspiracy theories for the past ten years, and extensively studied the cognitive, social, and political factors that contribute to conspiracy theories.

Other research interests include the causes of corruption, the roots of ideological extremism, the human instinct to punish offenders, justice-based responses to crime victims, procedural justice, and various other issues that are related with human morality and belief systems. He studies these topics from multidisciplinary perspectives including psychology, criminology, and political science.

Van Prooijen received funding for his research from various sources, and published widely on his research in the form of books, book chapters, and scientific journal articles. He presented his work for both lay and scientific audiences around the world, and regularly appears in the Dutch media.  

Jenny Svanberg

Jenny Svanberg

Jenny Svanberg qualified as a Clinical Psychologist in 2006 in Glasgow, Scotland. She later completed further training in Neuropsychology, and gained standard accreditation in Schema Therapy, approved by the International Society of Schema Therapy. After qualifying, she worked in addiction and neuro-rehabilitation services in Glasgow for five years, and then moved to lead on addiction psychology services in the NHS Forth Valley for another five years. During these roles, she contributed to research into Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome, a type of Alcohol-Related Brain Damage, and service-related research into addiction and complex trauma.

In doing so, she became interested in the way in which addiction and addictive behaviours represent one way of responding to threat or disempowerment, and how service systems can either exacerbate or reduce this. During her roles in Scotland, Jenny was involved with a number of British Psychological Society groups, including the Division of Clinical Psychology’s Faculty of Addiction, and latterly sat on the Scottish Government’s Partnership for Action on Drugs in Scotland Quality Sub-Group. She currently lives in London. 

Gary Wood

Gary Wood

Social Media / Internet presence:

Links supporting The Psychology of Gender book:

Dr Gary Wood is a Chartered Psychologist, solution-focused life coach, and broadcaster specializing in applied social psychology. He is on The British Psychological Society’s ‘media-friendly psychologists’ list and is widely quoted in the media offering psychological insights and coaching tips and as a featured advice columnist (agony-uncle) in magazines, on radio and television. Gary is also a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy and has taught psychology, sexual health studies, learning skills and research methods in several UK universities. As a consultant, he has worked on social policy research projects and reports, for government bodies, broadcasting regulators, sexual health organizations, NHS Trusts, LGBT charities and media companies. He also runs workshops on confidence building and goal setting.

Gary’s books, based on his workshops, include ‘Unlock Your Confidence’, ‘and ‘Sex, Lies and Stereotypes. His goal-setting and coaching book ‘Don’t Wait For Your Ship to Come In. . . Swim Out to Meet It’ has been translated into several languages, including French, Czech and Korean. Gary is in private practice as a personal and professional development coach, trainer, and research consultant, based in Birmingham and Edinburgh, UK, and internationally online. In his spare time, he eats, sleeps, reads, and occasionally sings.

Ken Rotenberg

Ken Rotenberg

Ken J. Rotenberg is a Professor in the School of Psychology at Keele University, Staffordshire, United Kingdom. His is currently employed as a Professorial Research Fellow. He has been involved in the Field of Psychology for 45 years that has extended across the sub-disciplines of social psychology, clinical psychology, educational psychology, and developmental psychology. The majority of his research has been dedicated to the topic of trust with his first publication on the topic in 1980. The research has produced scales to assess trust by individuals across the life span in a wide range of others (e.g., mothers, fathers, teachers, peers, police, politicians, and health professionals). The research has examined the relations between trust and various forms of psychosocial adjustment (prosocial behaviour and aggression) well as academic achievement. Professor Rotenberg has been on editorial boards of prestigious journals (e.g., Social Development, Eating Behaviors, International Society of Behavioral Develoment)and a member of prestigious organizations in the field of psychology.

Media Linked Presentations

Interview

https://www.facebook.com/KeeleUniversity/videos/vb.19097243336

Blogs

The EU Referendum: It is a Matter of Trust by Conversations (https://theconversation.com/the-eu-referendum-a-matter-of-who-to-trust-60504; June 13, 2016);

A social psychologist explains how authorities can regain survivors' trust after Grenfell Tower fire by Conversation (https://theconversation.com/a-social-psychologist-explains-how-authorities-can-regain-survivors-trust-after-grenfell-tower-fire-81696, September 4, 2017);

How to avoid war and conflict – with a little help from social psychology by Conversation (https://theconversation.com/how-to-avoid-war-and-conflict-with-a-little-help-from-social-psychology-831890800, October 4, 2017)

Carolyn Mair

Carolyn Mair

Professor Carolyn Mair is a Chartered Psychologist and Fellow of the British Psychological Society. She is a consultant working with the fashion industry and fashion educators providing expertise in human behaviour in the context of fashion. Prior to establishing her consultancy, psychology.fashion (http://psychology.fashion), she worked in Higher Education for 19 years. As Professor of Psychology for Fashion at London College of Fashion (LCF), University of the Arts London, she created the world's only Masters and Bachelor programmes to apply psychology within the broad context of fashion.

Under her direction, the MSc Applied Psychology of Fashion at LCF won the 2016 British Psychological Society’s prestigious Innovative Psychology Programme Award. Carolyn has been awarded research funding from Research Councils UK, Leverhulme and the British Academy and collaborated on a number of major international, multi-disciplinary research projects and consortia. She has published widely across many disciplines and is frequently featured in online and traditional media. Carolyn holds a PhD in Cognitive Neuroscience, MSc Research Methods and BSc (Hons) Applied Psychology and Computing. Prior to becoming an academic, she worked as a visual merchandiser, graphic designer, dressmaker and portrait artist. In her spare time, Carolyn goes to the gym and plays her saxophone.

Richard Gross

Richard Gross

After studying Psychology and Philosophy at Nottingham University, I went to Leicester University School of Education to study a taught M.A. (Ed.) in the Sociology of Education and Mass Communications.

Following a belated ‘gap year’, I went to Garnett Teacher Training College (part of London University), one of four colleges in the U.K. at the time preparing students for teaching specifically in Further Education (FE). At this time (1973), Psychology at pre-Degree level was only taught in FE colleges (i.e. not yet in schools), so I was destined for that sector (first London, then Oxford).

During my time in London, I spent a year on a teaching exchange in St. Paul, Minnesota, U.S. at a Community College offering two-year Liberal Arts Degrees (all of which required students to take a Psychology module).

Also while still in London, I published my first book, Psychology: The Science of Mind and Behaviour (1987), now in its seventh edition (2015). While the early editions were aimed largely at ‘A’ level students, the book was adopted by a broad range of courses (pure and applied), including Psychology and Nursing Degrees. Over the next 13 years, a number of other texts followed and in 2000 I decided to devote my time to writing full-time.

While at Oxford, I did some teaching on Nursing Degree/Diploma Courses at Oxford Brookes University and at the John Radcliffe Hospital. In 2007, I co-wrote Psychology for Nurses (second edition, 2014) with Nancy Kinnison.

Following the death of my mother and a friend who took his own life (both 2002), I had some bereavement counselling. This inspired me to want to train as a bereavement volunteer with Cruse Bereavement Care, the U.K.’s largest national bereavement support organisation. I started work with bereaved clients in 2006 and continue this work, as well as being a Supervisor and Trainer. It was through my Cruse activity that I came to write Understanding Grief: An Introduction (2016) and The Psychology of Grief (2018).

Geoff Beattie and Laura McGuire

Geoff Beattie and Laura McGuire

Professor Geoffrey Beattie is professor of psychology at Edge Hill University, with a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Cambridge. He was awarded the Spearman Medal by the British Psychological Society for 'published psychological research of outstanding merit' and the internationally acclaimed Mouton d'Or for his work in semiotics. He is a Fellow of the British Psychological Society, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts. He is the author of 25 books published by Granta, Victor Gollancz, Chatto & Windus, Penguin, Weidenfeld & Nicolson, Orion, Headline, Routledge etc.  His books have been translated into a variety of languages including Chinese, Taiwanese, German, Italian, Portuguese and Finnish. He has published over one hundred academic articles in a range of journals including Nature, Nature Climate Change and Semiotica. He was the resident on-screen psychologist for eleven series of Big Brother on Channel 4 from 2000-2010, and has presented a number of television series, including 'Life's Too Short' (BBC1), 'Family SOS' (BBC1), 'The Farm of Fussy Eaters' (UKTV) and 'Dump Your Mates in Four Days' (Channel 4). www.geoffbeattie.com

Dr. Laura McGuire is a postdoctoral research fellow in the Faculty of Education at Edge Hill University.  Her PhD research focussed on tackling an issue of global importance, namely why consumers are not doing more to change their behaviour in the face of the threat posed by climate change. Laura previously worked as a research assistant at the Sustainable Consumption Institute at the University of Manchester. Her early career was in drama and theatre; she also worked as a secondary school teacher in the north of England for ten years. She draws upon this diverse background to promote changes in attitudes to sustainability and climate change using a multi-disciplinary approach

Gayle Stever

Gayle Stever

Gayle Stever lives in the Finger Lakes region of New York State and teaches for Empire State College, a part of the State University of New York system. She is an associate professor and has taught psychology for Empire State/SUNY for 10 years. Before that she was on the faculty of Arizona State University for 15 years after having completed her Ph.D. in Lifespan development there in 1994. But her career began with a bachelor's degree in music education and a ten year stint as a music teacher and church musician. Given this background, it was a natural thing to gravitate to a study of the cultural influence of music via popular singers like The Beatles, Michael Jackson, Madonna, Bruce Springsteen, Josh Groban and others. A master's thesis and then doctoral dissertation in the study of fans led to further publications in the area of how media affects development, and the nature of what has come to be known as parasocial engagement, the social engagement of media personalities mostly known in other than a face-to-face environment. She has been married to her best friend for 42 years and has two adult sons of whom she is very proud.

Barry Richards

Barry Richards

Barry Richards is Professor of Political Psychology at Bournemouth University, UK, where he leads the MA Political Psychology programme. After a degree in psychology at the University of Reading, Barry trained and worked for some years as a clinical psychologist in the National Health Service, working primarily in the adult mental health field. He then undertook a PhD in sociology and began an academic career. Prior to moving to Bournemouth in 2001, he was Professor and Head of the Department of Human Relations at the University of East London, where he had worked from 1977. Barry’s previous books include Images of Freud: Cultural Responses to Psychoanalysis (1989), Disciplines of Delight: The Psychoanalysis of Popular Culture (1994), The Dynamics of Advertising (with I. MacRury & J. Botterill, 2000), Emotional Governance: Politics, Media and Terror (2007), and What Holds us Together: Popular Culture and Social Cohesion (2018).  Most of Barry’s academic career has been spent in teaching and writing based on using the insights of the psychoanalytic tradition to throw new light on some basic issues in contemporary society. He has pursued that aim in the study of both politics and popular culture, and of the increasing linkages between those two domains of life. Since it is always necessary to locate the individual mind in its social contexts, Barry has tried to take a psychosocial approach, by integrating psychological inquiry with the use of theories and data from sociology.

Fernand Gobet

Fernand Gobet

Fernand Gobet earned his Ph.D. in psychology in 1992 at the University of Fribourg, Switzerland. After a six-year stay at Carnegie Mellon in Pittsburgh, where he worked on chess expertise with Nobel Prize winner Herbert Simon, one of the founders of artificial intelligence, he was Senior Research Fellow and then the Allan Standen Reader in Intelligent Systems at the University of Nottingham. He moved to Brunel University in 2003 to take up a Chair in Cognitive Psychology. Since 2013, he is Professor of Decision Making and Expertise at the University of Liverpool. His main research interests are (a) the psychology of expertise and talent, (b) cognitive training, (c) the development of computer models of expertise and the acquisition of first language, and (d) in artificial intelligence, the use of genetic programming to automatically generate scientific theories. He is the designer of CHREST (Chunk Hierarchy and REtrieval STructures), one of the few cognitive architectures in the world. He has carried out extensive research on chess psychology and education. He has over 300 scientific publications, including 10 books. His latest books are Understanding Expertise: A Multi-Disciplinary Approach (London: Palgrave) and The Psychology of Chess (London: Routledge).

http://chrest.info/fg/home.htm   http://www.expertmind.uk

Trever Harley

Trever Harley is Emeritus Professor of Psychology at the University of Dundee, and a writer, science journalist, public speaker, and comedian. He was formerly Chair of Cognitive Psychology at Dundee, where he was Head of Department and then Dean from 2003 until 2016. Trevor grew up in Southampton, and did his undergraduate and postgraduate degrees at Cambridge, where his PhD thesis research was on slips of the tongue. Trevor was then at the University of Warwick until he moved north in 1996. He is the author of several books, including the best-selling text The Psychology of Language, currently in its fourth edition, and published in three languages. Trevor’s research interests are wide, including language, consciousness, sleep and dreams, ageing, futurology, and psychology and the weather. He has several obsessions, including music, photography, and the weather; he has kept weather records for many years, and his favourite month in recent times is December 2010.

Dr Ciaran Mc Mahon

Dr Ciarán Mc Mahon

My name is Ciarán Mc Mahon and I am the author of ‘The Psychology of Social Media’. I’m an academic psychologist living in Dublin, Ireland, with my wife and our one-year-old twin sons.

I have a B.Sc. in Psychology from University College Dublin, where a foundation in ‘hard science’ left me with a distinct perspective on the very soft science that is Psychology.

I continued my studies at UCD with a research master’s in the history of psychology, which was upgraded to doctoral status as I won a Government of Ireland Scholarship. My thesis, ‘The Pre-History of the Concept of ‘Attention’, traced changes in reflexive discourse from the Stoics to Descartes and Hobbes. It argued that ‘attention’ is fundamentally an artefact of the physiomorphic assimilation of the practice of reading.

I was awarded the European Society for the History of the Human Sciences Early Career Award for a paper which demonstrated that the psychological interior originates in the same historical period as a shift from oral to silent reading. This insight, published in the Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences, continues to guide my theoretical approach to human-technology interactions, including the psychology of social media.

Since graduation, I have worked at a number of third level institutions and have lectured on several undergraduate and postgraduate psychology courses. I have published peer-reviewed research on the popularity of social media, the cyberpsychology of online organised crime, digital wellness and the social impact of cybercrime. I have presented papers at many academic conferences and have delivered keynote addresses and participated in panels at various industry events.

Besides being an active user of social media, I began blogging on the psychology of Facebook in over a decade ago, and my Candidate.ie website, reporting on political social media, was archived by the National Library of Ireland. I have extensive media experience and regularly contribute to national and international broadcasters, and also have by-lines in a number of magazines and newspapers.

Finally, I remain abreast of policy and legislative developments across my research interests. I feel that it is of the utmost importance that social science academics inform public conversations with measured advice, especially with regard to sensitive topics like online safety and cyber security.